News and Announcements

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  • Wednesday, May 29, 2019 11:22 AM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    Rice students’ wireless epilepsy monitor wins in Japan

    Axon Mobile team tops international competition at IEEE circuits and systems symposium

    Rice University students who invented a device to give patients with intractable epilepsy more freedom to move have won first prize in a student competition at the IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems in Sapporo, Japan.

    The Axon Mobile team was invited to compete against four others after being named winner of the North American division. The members — junior Aidan Curtis and seniors Sophia D’Amico, Andres Gomez, Benjamin Klimko and Zhiyang Zhang, all electrical and computer engineering majors at Rice’s Brown School of Engineering — developed an instrument to gather signals from a patient’s brain and send them wirelessly for analysis.

    Rice University engineering students who developed a wireless recorder for intracranial epileptic seizure monitoring won the top prize at the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society student design competition in Sapporo, Japan. From left are students Andres Gomez, Aidan Curtis, Benjamin Klimko, Sophia D'Amico, and Zhiyang Zhang, and Joe Cavallaro, a Rice professor of electrical and computer engineering and of computer science. (Credit: Photo courtesy of Joe Cavallaro)

    Rice University engineering students who developed a wireless recorder for intracranial epileptic seizure monitoring won the top prize at the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society student design competition in Sapporo, Japan. From left are students Andres Gomez, Aidan Curtis, Benjamin Klimko, Sophia D’Amico, and Zhiyang Zhang, and Joe Cavallaro, a Rice professor of electrical and computer engineering and of computer science. Photo courtesy of Joe Cavallaro

    Rice University engineering students who developed a wireless recorder for intracranial epileptic seizure monitoring won the top prize at the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society student design competition in Sapporo, Japan. From left are students Andres Gomez, Aidan Curtis, Benjamin Klimko, Sophia D’Amico, and Zhiyang Zhang, and Joe Cavallaro, a Rice professor of electrical and computer engineering and of computer science. Photo courtesy of Joe Cavallaro

    Their goal is to untether patients who, while being monitored for seizures, must now remain bound to a computer that collects data from wires implanted in their brains. Because these patients are not helped by medication, they sometimes have small parts of the brain where seizures originate surgically removed. Data taken during seizures helps doctors pinpoint the location, but the process can take weeks.

    Competing teams were from China, the United Arab Emirates, Indonesia and Brazil.

    The Rice team was nominated for the Circuits and Systems Society regional competition by faculty members Joseph Cavallaro, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of computer science, and Gary Woods, a professor in the practice of computer technology and electrical and computer engineering. Cavallaro chairs the Houston chapter of the society and was in Japan with the team.

    The students were advised by Dr. Nitin Tandon, a professor of neurosurgery at the McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), and Caleb Kemere, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Rice. Tracy Volz, a Rice professor in the practice and director of the Engineering Communications Program, coached the team on its presentation.

    Cavallaro said the IEEE, Dean Reginald DesRoches, the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering’s Bybee Travel Fund and Tandon funded the students’ travel.

    Their presentation was broadcast via Facebook and remains available for viewing here: https://www.facebook.com/ieeecas/videos/336696273709955/

  • Monday, March 11, 2019 2:12 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    The Rice Board of Trustees recently recognized the staff of the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen (OEDK) for 10 years of providing transformative undergraduate education, a tenant of the university’s Vision for the Second Century, Second Decade (V2C2).

    OEDK staff
    Honored for their impact at the board’s Feb. 28 meeting were Amy Kavalewitz, executive director; Danny Blacker, engineering design supervisor; Marilee Dizon, department administrator; Fernando Cruz, engineering design technician; Sukaina Ahmed, accounting specialist; Lea Aden Lueck, engineering design coordinator; and Sondra Hernandez, purchasing assistant. The Department of Mechanical Engineering’s Joe Gesenhues, department technician and shop manager, was also recognized for providing invaluable assistance to OEDK teams.

    Maria Oden, director of the OEDK and a full teaching professor of bioengineering, commended the staff for making the kitchen a success for the more than 1,200 students who use it annually.

    “This group of people is willing to put in their all, go the extra mile, work as a well-oiled team – all for the benefit of Rice, our students and our faculty,” Oden said.

    The world’s first design kitchen, the OEDK was established in a building that was literally Rice’s campus kitchen, before separate serveries fed the residential colleges.

    The OEDK facility fosters collaboration between Rice students and industry professionals, physicians at the Texas Medical Center and globally, and entrepreneurs and community partners developing solutions to problems with potential societal impact.

    “When our students receive their dream jobs at SpaceX, Tesla, GE Healthcare … or are accepted into their dream graduate school and they tell us the main topic of their interview was the projects and experiences at OEDK, we can point to these staff members for making that possible,” Oden said.

     

     

    About Arie Passwaters

    Arie Wilson Passwaters is a Web editor in Rice University's Office of Public Affairs.
  • Monday, February 25, 2019 2:10 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)
    Custom laser-cut coasters greeted partygoers at the OEDK event. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

    Custom laser-cut coasters greeted partygoers at the OEDK event. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

    Hundreds of Rice students, faculty, staff and friends came out for the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen’s 10th anniversary bash on Feb. 22. The two-stage event began with a gathering of the facility’s backers at the OEDK and then moved to the North Lot for a public party featuring food and drink, an engineering art competition and ’80s music by the Spazmatics.

    Rice President David Leebron, speaking at the early event, said of the return on investment on money the university has spent over the last 10 years, “nowhere has it been better than where we are standing right now.”

    Read more about the OEDK’s early days here: http://news.rice.edu/2019/02/18/the-kitchen-at-10-is-really-cooking-now/

    Reginald DesRoches, the William and Stephanie Sick Dean of Engineering, left, get a high-five from his predecessor, Ned Thomas, at the OEDK party. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

    Reginald DesRoches, the William and Stephanie Sick Dean of Engineering, left, get a high-five from his predecessor, Ned Thomas, at the OEDK party. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

     

    OEDK Director Maria Oden gives early attendees a taste of what's to come at the kitchen in the years to come. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

    OEDK Director Maria Oden gives early attendees a taste of what’s to come at the kitchen in the years to come. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

     

    A crowd grooves to the Spazmatics in the large tent outside the OEDK.

    A crowd grooves to the Spazmatics in the large tent outside the OEDK.

     

    Fernanda Lago's "Generating an Idea," first place winner in the Engineering Art competition. Photo by An Le

    Fernanda Lago’s “Generating an Idea,” first place winner in the Engineering Art competition. Photo by An Le/Luxe Studio Productions

     

    A sophisticated sample of laser-cut wood sculpture was among the entries in a student art contest. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

    A sophisticated sample of laser-cut wood sculpture was among the entries in a student art contest. Photo by Jeff Fitlow

     

    Winners of the OEDK engineering art competition, from left: Scout Kan for "Gears of Inspiration," third place; Braden Perryman and Maggie Webb for "Natural Reflections," second place, and Fernanda Lago for "Generating an Idea," first place. Photo by An Le

    Winners of the OEDK engineering art competition, from left: Scout Kan for “Gears of Inspiration,” third place; Braden Perryman and Maggie Webb for “Natural Reflections,” second place, and Fernanda Lago for “Generating an Idea,” first place. Photo by An Le/Luxe Studio Productions

    Video by An Le/Luxe Studio Productions

    About Mike Williams

    Mike Williams is a senior media relations specialist in Rice University's Office of Public Affairs.
  • Wednesday, December 05, 2018 2:31 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)


    SAVE THE DATE!
    RSVP TODAY!

    OEDK@X Logo

    OEDK@X Flyer

    Friday, February 22, 2019
    5:00pm - 10:00pm
    Parking Lot Party @ the OEDK


    Mark your calendars for a very special day!
    The OEDK will be turning 10 and we are going to celebrate BIG!


     More Details to come...

    Special Guest Performance!
    You won't want to miss this!



  • Thursday, May 10, 2018 2:22 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    Down on the farm … in your apartment

    By Holly Beretto
    Special to the Rice News

    Vegetables are part of a healthy diet, but urban apartment dwellers in some places around the world don’t have regular access to them. A group of Rice University senior engineering students set out to remedy that for their capstone design project.

    Team Växthus — mechanical engineering students Mary Bao, Mike Hua, Jack Kaplan, Harrison Lin and Colin Losey and electrical engineering student Lingbo Chen – has developed an automated, modular, indoor greenhouse to provide high-throughput food growth aimed at young professionals in urban settings.

    “This allows them to grow fresh produce, everything from leafy greens to herbs to root vegetables,” Lin said.

    Växthus (Swedish for greenhouse) was developed for the HSB Living Lab at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden. The lab is a residential community of 29 apartments for students and visiting researchers, all of whom are involved in finding solutions for more sustainable living. The Living Lab partnered with Rice on a previous project to develop a device to simplify composting at home.

    READ MORE AND SEE VIDEO

  • Thursday, May 03, 2018 2:20 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    AMY MCCAIG  – MAY 3, 2018

    New software designed by Rice University students working in the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen and Liu Idea Lab for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Lilie) can provide automated sports analytics in an hour.

    Team Cherrypick (Photo by Jeff Fitlow)

    Team Cherrypick (Photo by Jeff Fitlow)

    The software, Cherrypick, was designed by James Grinage, Connor Heggie, Rebecca Lee, Victor Gonzalez, Sachin Jain and Betty Huang as part of their senior engineering design course. The software is the first kind capable of automatically analyzing volleyball matches and providing analytics. It allows coaches to record a game, upload video and receive statistics from the game within an hour. Cherrypick is powered by machine learning and computer vision algorithms developed by the team and is the first software capable of delivering game statistics in an hour.

    READ MORE AND SEE VIDEO

  • Thursday, April 26, 2018 2:18 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    6-legged ‘horse’ rides to the rescue

    MIKE WILLIAMS

     – APRIL 26, 2018

    Rice University students are working toward a long-standing goal of making the benefits of hippotherapy – equine-assisted therapy – available to those without access to a real horse.

    The students’ robotic device adds levels of sophistication to the project started several years ago. Their steed, named Stewie, is more comfortable and they believe more controllable for riders with neurological or movement disorders or problems with balance who could gain physical and mental benefits.

    READ MORE AND SEE VIDEO

  • Wednesday, April 25, 2018 2:16 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    Students pursue innard peace for infants

    MIKE WILLIAMS

     – APRIL 25, 2018

    It should go without saying it takes guts to develop a low-cost procedure to treat gastroschisis. A team of Rice University students working on the problem had them in every way.

    The three members of Team Si-Low built a sophisticated system that would be simple for doctors in developing countries to execute as they help infants born with the condition, in which the abdominal wall is not fully closed and some of the child’s intestines remain outside the body at birth.

    READ MORE AND SEE VIDEO


  • Tuesday, April 24, 2018 1:53 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    Heart is where the chips are, helping keep the beat

    MIKE WILLIAMS

     – APRIL 24, 2018

    A Rice University student team’s demonstration of a next-generation, wireless pacemaker array could point to the future of medical sensors.

    The Love and Pace team of Rice electrical and computer engineering seniors demonstrated its design for a pacemaker that would place a network of chips the size of a grain of rice in various places inside the heart. These would communicate with a base station located under a patient’s skin and charge via radio frequency.

    READ MORE AND SEE VIDEO


  • Monday, April 16, 2018 1:50 PM | Amy Kavalewitz (Administrator)

    AMY MCCAIG  – APRIL 16, 2018

    A team of Rice University students hopes a device they developed to train doctors and nurses in developing countries and low-resource areas in the U.S. to prevent and treat cervical cancer will improve the outlook for women with this disease.

    OEDK Gyno-mite team

    From left: Christine Luk, Rachel Lambert, Sonia Parra and Elizabeth Stone. Photo credit: Jeff Fitlow.


    Cervical cancer kills close to 300,000 women per year worldwide, with approximately 85 percent of these deaths occurring in developing countries.

    Rice students Christine Luk, Elizabeth Stone and Rachel Lambert are senior design students enrolled in the course Global Health Design. Together with graduate student Sonia Parra, they developed a low-cost, interactive training model that mimics a woman’s pelvic region and can be used to practice different cervical cancer screening and treatment procedures. The training model, which was developed at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen (OEDK) and was based on models developed by other teams of students over the past few years (including Christine Diaz ’17, current Rice students Caroline Brigham, Theresa Sonka and Karen Vasquez, and Malawi Polytechnic students Waheed Mia and Mary Mnewa) was created in collaboration with the Rice 360° Institute for Global Health and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

    READ MORE AND SEE VIDEO


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Phone: 713.348.OEDK

Email: oedk@rice.edu

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